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An updated/revised consolidation on a number of other older post about building a natural gas or propane forge ( To be proofed again as time allows)

—-Disclaimer: I’m an idiot, putting my words into any actions is an absolute form of neglect. Any reader is responsible for their own safety and should not consider me an expert—

When building a forge: Insulation type, internal forge shape and dimensions, burner style and size are all important.

Notes on burners and forge pairings:

*Orifice* size and pressure, affect flow volume and gas velocity. Regulate the pressure and change the size of the *burner fuel vent hole* (*orifice*) to match the internal volume of the forge. Flow affects **aspiration** in this case “natural aspirated”; atmosphere is drawn into the burner body by the speed and volume of the fuel. Increasing the fuel increases the draft/suction/aspiration effect; but too much too slowly and you won’t have enough room in the path of travel for outside gasses to enter and mix effectively. You want the air and fuel to mix inside the burner and ignite inside the forge. Often forges without a well designed burner run fine when up to heat but not so well warming up due to erratic or improper gas travel inside the burner tube and during the transition from burner to forge.— Many little things happen that we can’t observe directly when tuning a forge/burner; but there are signs and symptoms. Look listen and feel. Trial and error will teach you if you’ve got the ***tools*** (***knowing how it works***).

After plumbing in some sort of regulation- then figure out how to reduce or increase the orifice size. As a start (weld/hi-temp braze/drill) or adjust the size of the forge and size of the burner tube depending on your needs and operating expense. To prevent accidents (I feel obligated to say this even if you must know I’m an idiot.): Keep a pilot light going during testing and never let flammable gases build up in a constrained or restricted area — At least these are my poorly educated guesses. I seem to be on the right path and have ****safely**** (****to a degree that my luck hasn’t run out and neither myself nor my property has been greatly damaged****) made and used a handful of forges since this publication in it’s original form. One of these opinions might be a step in the right direction for a reader. (<-again see the disclaimer)

Fabricating the shell/forge body was filled with bad ideas and potential chances at bodily harm (cutting open a container that once held flammable gasses and dealing with galvanized steel)- but with the help of a good friend we managed to both accomplish the task physically unharmed. Any psychological (pyrological?) damage is irrelevant and probably pre-existing:
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A ceramic fiber blanket was cut and fitted as insulation for the forge. Then a castable refractory was applied for health (loose ceramic fibers are not good for you) and durability.

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The refractory drying. Wax paper kept the parts from adhering.

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A bit O’ flare.

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A masonry wheel on an angle grinder was used to clean up the cured refractory.

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A clamp was used for testing (and firing the refractory coating) on the the burner made by hybridburners.com/

The final step not photo’d was brushing on a thin white high temp and UV reflective coating to improve temperatures and fuel efficiency.

Testing after the plistex900f UV coating.

The “dragons breath” is a visual cue when tuning the forge.

The forge retains heat well and even better with a bit of ceramic blanket over the mouth.

In this video you can see the forge at welding temperatures and learn a bit about pattern welding:
 

Thanks to:
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Ship shape

Fabricated ship LED light frame. For theholidaylightstore.com

Fabricated ship LED light frame. For theholidaylightstore.com

Not much more to add. Very cool talk hosted in Raleigh with Roy Underhill of the Woodwrights Shop on PBS and the Woodwrights School in Chapel Hill, NC.

Bits and Bobbles.

Experimentation with steel, glass, bronze, copper and acrylic paint.

Here is a nice post  I wanted to share by Jarrod StoneDahl.

freedom 001

Pirateblacksmith pre-interlude-art meme posting number 001-xxxx- awesome fun time.
three quarter hp 001

I’ve not posted an in-depth project step by step in some time.

The legs were forged and fabricated to reduce overall dimensions for shipping purposes.

The legs were forged and fabricated to reduce overall dimensions for shipping purposes.

The whole of the grill was wire brushed to bare metal and then heated to 500 degrees and coated with cooking oil to preserve the piece and provide a better cooking surface.

The whole of the grill was wire brushed to bare metal and then heated to 500 degrees and coated with cooking oil to preserve the piece and offer a better cooking surface.

The whole of the grill was wire brushed to bare metal and then heated to 500 degrees and coated with cooking oil to preserve the piece and provide a better cooking surface.

The whole of the grill was wire brushed to bare metal and then heated to 500 degrees and coated with cooking oil to preserve the piece and provide a better cooking surface.

The rivets are superficial as the 1/2 round cross bars are welded in place underneath the grill. Upsetting then ends was an aesthetic choice.

The rivets are superficial as the 1/2 round cross bars are welded in place underneath the grill. Upsetting then ends was an aesthetic choice.

The project started with a set of dimensions (24″x16″ with 7″ clearance underneath) given to me. Then I presenting various designs and features.

fireplace grill concepts for cooking

fireplace grill concepts for cooking

fireplace grill concepts for cooking (steel*)

fireplace grill concepts for cooking (steel*)

fireplace grill concepts for cooking

fireplace grill concepts for cooking

fireplace grill concepts for cooking

fireplace grill concepts for cooking

fireplace grill concepts for cooking

fireplace grill concepts for cooking

fireplace grill concepts for cooking

fireplace grill concepts for cooking

I began work with two of the forged elements out of 1/2″ round.

IMG_20140131_181000
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Starting the leaf

Starting the leaf

The leaf finished

The leaf finished

The first two elements put together. This isn't traditional joinery but modern; later they where electric arc-welded underneath in place during assembly.

The first two elements put together. This isn’t traditional joinery but modern; later they where electric arc-welded underneath in place during assembly.

Next the 1/4 round that makes up the actual grilling surface was scroll on both ends Extras where made ahead of time as only the best made the cut. the cut

Next the 1/4 round that makes up the actual grilling surface was scroll on both ends Extras where made ahead of time as only the best made the cut. the cut

 

Arranging and tweaking the 1/4" round pieces.

Arranging and tweaking the 1/4″ round pieces.

 

A hole was punched and drifted on the opposite end of the leafed bar. Rings wer fabricated cold around a mandrel and all but the last forged element was welded as subtly as possible.

A hole was punched then drifted on the opposite end of the leafed bar. Rings were fabricated cold around a mandrel and all but the last forged element was welded as subtly as possible.

A 16" piece of 2x2x1/4 inch angle iron would become the last element. Holes were drilled to allow the 1/2" round to pass through.

A 16″ piece of 2x2x1/4 inch angle iron would become the last element. Holes were drilled to allow the 1/2″ round to pass through.

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The angle iron was cut, forged and texture

The angle iron was cut, forged and texture

The angle iron was cut, forged and texture

The angle iron was cut, forged and texture

The angle iron was cut, forged and texture

The angle iron was cut, forged and texture

The angle iron was cut, forged and texture

The angle iron was cut, forged and texture

 

The angle iron was welded in place and the 1/2" round was upset  to form a faux rivet head.

The angle iron was welded in place and the 1/2″ round was upset to form a faux rivet head.

 

The legs were forged and fabricated and tested. But I'm afraid I don't have time to share that bit.

The legs were forged, fabricated and tested. But I’m afraid I don’t have time to share that bit.

Project was completed for a kind ‘gent at $125 shipped to PA, USA. It was great fun to make and as always a learning experience. I’ve got to make one for myself next!
Thanks- Greg
*To be proofed at some point

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