A flower candleholder wall hook

I made this flower candle holder and wall hook not so long ago. Here’s how:
I started by forging a leaf out on the end of a piece of flatbar
I then forge welded about 21″ of the bar stock over onto itself. I tapered the end and cut a small indent close to halfway to prepare for the next weld.
I folded it over once again and forge welded it.
After welding was complete I started to form a fishtail with the crosspein.
The bar is now about 1/2″x1/2″ and I still needed to punch a hole and trim the fishtail with a chisels (not photoed)
The bar was then folded and welded for a third time. This is a bit more time-consuming than jump welding smaller stock to a 1/2″x1/2″ base would be I imagine, but the finished product would look different.
I forged the hook and I can start shaping the stem to the flower. When bending the hook I noticed it was about 20 degree off horizontally when mounted flat on the wall. Instead of straightening it out and redoing it I just twisted it to the right angle. This gave an undesirable line that I refined later.
The bulk of the work is done.
This isn’t an occult blacksmithing ritual. I cut out a small semi-circle for the flower and drew a star to mark the pedals.
I used snips and a punch to form the flower. It took a little sanding too.
Rose candle hook 11
A crosspein on a stump gave the pedals texture.
rose candle hook 12
I cut off the excess stem and bent it around to secure the flower. (You can also see a steak turner I made a while before I could finish the hook and candle holder).
These little scented candles come with a thin metal pan that I glued into the center of the flower using JB-weld.

I’ll get a better picture of it mounted sometime soon I hope.
I’ve got some more projects to post eventually and some more how-to stuff too.
(update)
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–Greg

Tiny tongs from RR-spikes.

Here they are polished up a bit. (touched with a worn sanding wheel and wire brush)
They’re more pliers when they’re this size. They’re functional as is but I want to flatten the grooved jaws a bit and give them some more decorative flair. A gift to my grandfather.










They hold 1/8″ round firmly.

Until next time…
To see the finished tongs, checkout the next post on tongs.

–Greg

Scurvy Dog Cutlass

This was a piece of medium carbon steel(?) reclaimed and straightend to barstock. Forged with charcoal.

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I went with a wrapped hemp cord handle.
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–Greg

Land Lubber Cutlass

finishing
You can see the PriceSmith and Jolly Roger etch.
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Less visible is the subtable lightening etch that covers most of it’s large blade.
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The horseshoe probably came from my grandfathers ol’ horse RoyalBoy. A fine horse.

–Greg

The AAAPirate Blacksmith Blog

AAAPirateBlacksmith forgery — “Where I’m not a real blacksmith, but I smell like one”

I’m an odd guy at times with an interesting perspective of the world. I like to work with my hands and make.. well.. stuff. I really get a kick out of sharing it with folks and I hope ya’ll enjoy it. Thanks – Greg Price (Greg Pricesmith)

Hey folks, I’m the blacksmith’s wife!!! I help in the shop from time to time, do a little chainmaille on the side, and play tons of piano. I also enjoy working with my hands and helping my husband share his passion for metal work with the world. Enjoy our blog! — Ashley Smith (AshleyPriceSmith)

Working the bellows and hearth.
Working the bellows and hearth with Eric “Solvar” Campbell at the historic Joel Lane house museum In Raleigh, NC.
I listened a lot to some of the other smiths. Here you can see Mr. Green in the foreground and Al the kind fellow who taught me nail making at my first Abana meeting. (I'm in the background probably about to burn myself =P)
My First time demonstrating at the NCstate Fair. I enjoyed listening to some of the other smiths. Here you can see Mr. Green in the foreground and Al the kind fellow who taught me nail making at my first Abana meeting. (I’m in the background probably about to burn myself =P)
Merry Pumpkins!
Merry Pumpkins!
Look at all that class.
Look at all that class.
I didn't do it
I didn’t do it
After I let it normalize, I heated the cut-off and then quenched it in oil.
Quenching a newly heat-treated tool.