Mini Unicorn Horn Bottle Opener

**Don’t worry, unicorn horns grow back. I tagged it and released it back into the wild. No unicorn colts or fillies were captured** Made from fragments of adult unicorn horns these are designed as a product these are tried, true, repeatable and affordable. While not one of a kind like those in the full sized Unicorn horn bottle opener; each lid lifter is hand forged with a tiny scroll and is unique in some small way. You'll never see one like it on the self of your local stop and shop. A craft beer won't taste better with my bottle opener, but it'll feel better - Greg D. PriceSmith
**Don’t worry, unicorn horns grow back. I tagged it and released it back into the wild. No unicorn colts or fillies were captured**
Made from fragments of adult unicorn horns these are designed as a product these are tried, true, repeatable and affordable. While not one of a kind like those in the full sized Unicorn horn bottle opener; each lid lifter is hand forged and is unique in some small way. You’ll never see one like it on the self of your local stop and shop.
A craft beer won’t taste better with my bottle opener, but it’ll feel better – Greg D. PriceSmith

Buy one on etsy!

Socket Wrench forged into bottle opener.

I’ve been dabbling with some bottle openers from wrenches and socket wenches.. er wrenches.
I’m a po-boy shade tree sort so I aim to err on the side of caution. When an unknown sort of steel is used – danger is always a chance.

Socket wrench repurchased into forged bottle openers.
Socket wrench repurchased into forged bottle openers.
They're be customized to order.
They’ll be customized to order.




— Random other cool stuff to waste your time with —





Homemadetools.net
is such a great resource for finding and sharing knowledge. Check out these Tips from Old Millrat – James D. Thompson he makes Mini Scorps


The following except is from Cartech.com:
Carpenter Stainless Steel “Blue Book”: Fabrication

Revised June 2006


Forging Carpenter Stainless Steels

In all metalworking operations, stainless steel can be easily worked when the characteristics of these alloys are understood. Stainless steels have good inherent forgeability, but there are important differences from the carbon and low-alloy steels.

Most importantly, stainless steels are much stronger at forging temperatures and thus require greater force or more blows under a hammer than is required for leaner alloys. The high temperature alloys are even harder and more resistant to flow in forging operations.

All stainless steels have much lower thermal conductivity than ordinary steel—thus the heat penetrates the steel more slowly. The best results are obtained in a muffle or semimuffle type of furnace with pyrometer control. Keep open flames away from the steel.

As shown in the table, the forging temperature depends upon the type of steel—austenitic, martensitic, ferritic, duplex or precipitation hardenable, with a few special cases. There is no simple rule to follow for thermal handling on either heating or cooling. The suggested forging temperatures should be attained by heating in furnaces held at those temperatures (all temperatures are furnace temperatures, not die temperatures). The furnace must not be run excessively hot and the steel withdrawn “on the fly” as it rushes up to the forging heat. This gives a wash heat on the surface and a cold center.

Grade

Forge Below

Forge Above

Special Instructions

°F

°C

°F

°C

Type 302
Type 304
Type 304L
NeutroSorb PLUS® alloy

1700
1700
1700
1800

927
927
927
982

2300
2300
2300
2200

1260
1260
1260
1204

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings in air.
Anneal after forging to restore corrosion resistance.

Forging temperature varies
with Boron Content.

Type 303
Type 303Se
Type 305
Type 309
Type 309S

Type 310
Type 310S
Type 384
Type 316
Type 316L

Type 317
Type 321
Type 347
20Cb-3® stainless

1700
1700
1700
1800
1800

1800
1800
1700
1700
1700

1700
1700
1700
1800

927
927
927
982
982

982
982
927
927
927

927
927
927
982

2300
2300
2300
2250
2250

2250
2250
2250
2300
2300

2300
2300
2250
2250

1260
1260
1260
1232
1232

1232
1232
1232
1260
1260

1260
1260
1232
1232

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings in air.
Anneal after forging to restore corrosion resistance.

Type 410
Type 414
Type 416

1650
1650
1700

899
899
927

2200
2200
2250

1204
1204
1232

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings in air. Do not quench.
Anneal after forging to avoid cracking; cool to room temperature before annealing.
Type 420
Type 420F

1650
1650

899
899

2200
2200

1204
1204

Slow preheat is necessary.
Cool forgings very slowly. Furnace cooling preferred.
Anneal after forging to avoid cracking; cool to room temperature before annealing.
Type 431

1650

899

2200

1204

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings slowly.
Anneal after forging to avoid cracking; cool to room temperature before annealing.
Type 440A
Type 440B
Type 440C
Type 440F

1700
1700
1700
1700

927
927
927
927

2200
2150
2100
2100

1204
1177
1149
1149

Slow preheat is necessary.
Cool forgings very slowly. Furnace cooling preferred.
Anneal after forging to avoid cracking; cool to room temperature before annealing.
Pyromet® Alloy 355

1700

927

2100

1149

Slow preheat is not necessary. Air cool, equalize and overtemper.
Custom 455® stainless
Custom 450® stainless
Custom 630 (17Cr-4Ni)

1650
1650
1850

899
899
1010

2300
2300
2200

1260
1260
1204

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings in air and anneal.
Type 409Cb
Type 430
Type 430F
7-Mo® stainless

1500
1500
1500
1700

816
816
816
927

2050
2050
2100
2000

1121
1121
1149
1093

Slow preheat is necessary.
Cool forgings in air.
When reheating, use lower forging temperature and
finish cold as possible for optimum grain refinement.
Anneal after forging to restore corrosion resistance.
7-Mo® PLUS stainless

2150

1177

2375

1302

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings in air.
Anneal after forging to restore corrosion resistance.

Hold the heating furnace steady at the proper forging temperature and no hotter; allow the steel to soak out a little before withdrawing, and it will flow readily under the dies. In order not to slow down the forging operation and still run the furnace at a “slow” heat, more bars or billets can usually be heated at one time.

Most grades are subject to rapid grain growth at the forging heat. If all parts of the steel are thoroughly forged after heating, the grain structure will be refined again. If some parts of the forging get little reduction under the hammer, care must be exercised to limit grain growth by avoiding a long soak at temperature.

Surface preparation of forging bars and billets is generally more critical for stainless steels for several reasons. One example is the aircraft industry, which demands close tolerances for weight economy. This allows little or nothing for removing defects from finished parts. Any forging job will cost less if no defects must be removed because of poorly prepared stock.

Lastly, stainless steels require special heat treatments after forging to obtain best corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. (See the chart.) Briefly, the austenitic, ferritic and duplex grades should be annealed for optimum corrosion resistance; the martensitic grades are air-hardening and require slow cooling after forging plus subsequent annealing to prevent cracking; and the precipitation hardenable grades require a solution anneal for optimum aging response.

Carpenter practices have been perfected for developing stainless steels that have optimum forgeability as opposed to, say, optimum machinability. The factors that contribute to good inherent forgeability in Carpenter stainless steel are as follows:

1. Controlled melting process for sounder centers, cleaner metal and less center segregation.

2. Balanced analysis for better metal flow, reduced hot shortness, and less in-process preparations.

3. Rare earth additions to highly alloyed austenitic grades such as 20Cb-3® stainless for reduced hot shortness and better yields.

Every metal fabricator who hot-works steels and alloys knows how important it is to determine the best temperature range for forging each grade. The more narrow the forging range, the more critical the problem becomes.

Many tests used to predict hot-working temperature ranges are helpful in that they offer a rough measure of forgeability over a given range, but they do not give specific values. This has forced forgers to rely on approximate temperatures which, in many cases, are not the best ones for the material being worked.

Hot tensile ductility is often used to determine the forging temperature range for a given alloy. Evaluation is performed using a Gleeble thermomechanical testing unit. The main feature of the unit is the ability to reproduce any desired thermal cycle on a test specimen via resistive heating.

Whereas inherent forging quality is melted into stainless steels, there is another equally important aspect to Carpenter forging quality: mechanical forgeability. This includes factors that contribute to soundness:

1. Disc inspection and sonic inspection of in-process billets and finished forging billets.

2.Adequate surface preparation both on in-process billets for manufacturing forging bars and also final surface preparation of forging bars and billets

3. Quality control upset forging tests conducted on critical forging bar items.

Ask your Carpenter representative for additional information on Carpenter stainless steels for the forging industry.

Back to Stainless Steel Blue Book contents

As I Talk To Myself

In trying to live an examined life- I’ve had to ask myself “of all the things I’m capable of making- why such a focus on bottle openers?”

The world doesn’t need another- I could say that the sole reason- Is quintessentially in what art is when fully distilled to it’s most volatile- “Unnecessary”. Perhaps the choice is symbolic- Homage to, and a weapon against, the daemons that possess my mind, body and soul- Most likely it’s: Pointless; Frivolous; Self-indulgence. Calling it art sounds less obscene. Perhaps calling it a niche that begs to be filled is a lie, but it’s certainly a desirable one. The lie as much or more than the niche. The game more than the void.

I create to make. I make to create. And I love what I do.

IMG_20150115_120019
A Preview of an Upcoming Forged-Art Bottle Opener.

Mini Dragon Heart Bottle Opener

A pocket sized version of the dragon heart bottle opener this one is tried, true, and repeatable making it an affordable opener that is just the right mix of ferocity and cuteness.

Mini Dragon Heart Bottle Opener
Mini Dragon Heart Bottle Opener
Mini Dragon Heart Bottle Opener
Mini Dragon Heart Bottle Opener
Mini Dragon Heart Bottle Opener
Mini Dragon Heart Bottle Opener

Available on etsy! ( goo.gl/b7rsbr )

New Etsy Store Announcement

I’m happy to announce the AAAPirateBlacksmith Blog now has an etsy store. Procedes should go towards going Ad-free by years end and higheir quality photos – videos – and of coarse better metal work! With any luck it’ll help keep us here warm, dry and well fed too! Thank you kindly!