A flower candleholder wall hook

I made this flower candle holder and wall hook not so long ago. Here’s how:
I started by forging a leaf out on the end of a piece of flatbar
I then forge welded about 21″ of the bar stock over onto itself. I tapered the end and cut a small indent close to halfway to prepare for the next weld.
I folded it over once again and forge welded it.
After welding was complete I started to form a fishtail with the crosspein.
The bar is now about 1/2″x1/2″ and I still needed to punch a hole and trim the fishtail with a chisels (not photoed)
The bar was then folded and welded for a third time. This is a bit more time-consuming than jump welding smaller stock to a 1/2″x1/2″ base would be I imagine, but the finished product would look different.
I forged the hook and I can start shaping the stem to the flower. When bending the hook I noticed it was about 20 degree off horizontally when mounted flat on the wall. Instead of straightening it out and redoing it I just twisted it to the right angle. This gave an undesirable line that I refined later.
The bulk of the work is done.
This isn’t an occult blacksmithing ritual. I cut out a small semi-circle for the flower and drew a star to mark the pedals.
I used snips and a punch to form the flower. It took a little sanding too.
Rose candle hook 11
A crosspein on a stump gave the pedals texture.
rose candle hook 12
I cut off the excess stem and bent it around to secure the flower. (You can also see a steak turner I made a while before I could finish the hook and candle holder).
These little scented candles come with a thin metal pan that I glued into the center of the flower using JB-weld.

I’ll get a better picture of it mounted sometime soon I hope.
I’ve got some more projects to post eventually and some more how-to stuff too.
(update)
1119121118a
–Greg

Joel Lane house on the fourth of July

In lieu of a lengthy post I’m just sharing some photo’s from a demonstration my wife and I had a chance to help out with at the Joel Lane house in Raleigh, NC. Their fourth of July celebration was a lot of fun, great music, lots of crafts and good food. If you’re ever in the area give them a visit. The museum is a lovely place. The grounds are wonderfully maintained and attractive. A very friendly group of people working together to keep history alive and it’s mostly done by volunteer efforts so if you drop by consider making a donation.

Working the bellows and hearth.

 

Forging a small leaf

 

Here you can see the portable bellows and hearth. Great craftsmanship on the bellows.

 

The atmosphere was great and pleasant on the ears!

 

The smell of stew was enough alone to draw a hungry crowd cooked up in true mountain man style over an open fire.
There was calligraphy with quill and ink.
The writing was truly elegant, I wish we had a better photo.

 

A chandler at work making candles.
Some of his goods and tools

 

Splint weaving was just one of this gentleman’s talents, he’s also a talented blacksmith I was later informed.

 

Thank you to the Joel Lane House and museum staff/volunteers for making such a great holiday celebration possible, and especially Mr. Campbell for allowing me to help out around the forge.

 

I wouldn’t have had most of these photo’s if it wasn’t for Ashley, my lovely wife’s help. She was everywhere at once it seemed helping wherever she could and taking many more photos than I have time to share! Thank you sweet heart.

–Greg

Drag in the dragons!

My little dragon isn’t finished — But it has turned out better than it could have. Next time I’m going to do things a bit differently, but I learned a lot and I think I’ll be able to do a much better ob next time. I think I’m going to draw out the horns a bit more and turn it into a candle holder. I haven’t done a lot of metal carving or animal heads so this was a great chance for me to use my post vice! Planing out how to do the different parts of the twist was a real bugger =P But it truly gives a great effect in my opinion. What do you think so far?









–Greg