Socket Wrench forged into bottle opener.

I’ve been dabbling with some bottle openers from wrenches and socket wenches.. er wrenches.
I’m a po-boy shade tree sort so I aim to err on the side of caution. When an unknown sort of steel is used – danger is always a chance.

Socket wrench repurchased into forged bottle openers.
Socket wrench repurchased into forged bottle openers.
They're be customized to order.
They’ll be customized to order.




— Random other cool stuff to waste your time with —





Homemadetools.net
is such a great resource for finding and sharing knowledge. Check out these Tips from Old Millrat – James D. Thompson he makes Mini Scorps


The following except is from Cartech.com:
Carpenter Stainless Steel “Blue Book”: Fabrication

Revised June 2006


Forging Carpenter Stainless Steels

In all metalworking operations, stainless steel can be easily worked when the characteristics of these alloys are understood. Stainless steels have good inherent forgeability, but there are important differences from the carbon and low-alloy steels.

Most importantly, stainless steels are much stronger at forging temperatures and thus require greater force or more blows under a hammer than is required for leaner alloys. The high temperature alloys are even harder and more resistant to flow in forging operations.

All stainless steels have much lower thermal conductivity than ordinary steel—thus the heat penetrates the steel more slowly. The best results are obtained in a muffle or semimuffle type of furnace with pyrometer control. Keep open flames away from the steel.

As shown in the table, the forging temperature depends upon the type of steel—austenitic, martensitic, ferritic, duplex or precipitation hardenable, with a few special cases. There is no simple rule to follow for thermal handling on either heating or cooling. The suggested forging temperatures should be attained by heating in furnaces held at those temperatures (all temperatures are furnace temperatures, not die temperatures). The furnace must not be run excessively hot and the steel withdrawn “on the fly” as it rushes up to the forging heat. This gives a wash heat on the surface and a cold center.

Grade

Forge Below

Forge Above

Special Instructions

°F

°C

°F

°C

Type 302
Type 304
Type 304L
NeutroSorb PLUS® alloy

1700
1700
1700
1800

927
927
927
982

2300
2300
2300
2200

1260
1260
1260
1204

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings in air.
Anneal after forging to restore corrosion resistance.

Forging temperature varies
with Boron Content.

Type 303
Type 303Se
Type 305
Type 309
Type 309S

Type 310
Type 310S
Type 384
Type 316
Type 316L

Type 317
Type 321
Type 347
20Cb-3® stainless

1700
1700
1700
1800
1800

1800
1800
1700
1700
1700

1700
1700
1700
1800

927
927
927
982
982

982
982
927
927
927

927
927
927
982

2300
2300
2300
2250
2250

2250
2250
2250
2300
2300

2300
2300
2250
2250

1260
1260
1260
1232
1232

1232
1232
1232
1260
1260

1260
1260
1232
1232

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings in air.
Anneal after forging to restore corrosion resistance.

Type 410
Type 414
Type 416

1650
1650
1700

899
899
927

2200
2200
2250

1204
1204
1232

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings in air. Do not quench.
Anneal after forging to avoid cracking; cool to room temperature before annealing.
Type 420
Type 420F

1650
1650

899
899

2200
2200

1204
1204

Slow preheat is necessary.
Cool forgings very slowly. Furnace cooling preferred.
Anneal after forging to avoid cracking; cool to room temperature before annealing.
Type 431

1650

899

2200

1204

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings slowly.
Anneal after forging to avoid cracking; cool to room temperature before annealing.
Type 440A
Type 440B
Type 440C
Type 440F

1700
1700
1700
1700

927
927
927
927

2200
2150
2100
2100

1204
1177
1149
1149

Slow preheat is necessary.
Cool forgings very slowly. Furnace cooling preferred.
Anneal after forging to avoid cracking; cool to room temperature before annealing.
Pyromet® Alloy 355

1700

927

2100

1149

Slow preheat is not necessary. Air cool, equalize and overtemper.
Custom 455® stainless
Custom 450® stainless
Custom 630 (17Cr-4Ni)

1650
1650
1850

899
899
1010

2300
2300
2200

1260
1260
1204

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings in air and anneal.
Type 409Cb
Type 430
Type 430F
7-Mo® stainless

1500
1500
1500
1700

816
816
816
927

2050
2050
2100
2000

1121
1121
1149
1093

Slow preheat is necessary.
Cool forgings in air.
When reheating, use lower forging temperature and
finish cold as possible for optimum grain refinement.
Anneal after forging to restore corrosion resistance.
7-Mo® PLUS stainless

2150

1177

2375

1302

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings in air.
Anneal after forging to restore corrosion resistance.

Hold the heating furnace steady at the proper forging temperature and no hotter; allow the steel to soak out a little before withdrawing, and it will flow readily under the dies. In order not to slow down the forging operation and still run the furnace at a “slow” heat, more bars or billets can usually be heated at one time.

Most grades are subject to rapid grain growth at the forging heat. If all parts of the steel are thoroughly forged after heating, the grain structure will be refined again. If some parts of the forging get little reduction under the hammer, care must be exercised to limit grain growth by avoiding a long soak at temperature.

Surface preparation of forging bars and billets is generally more critical for stainless steels for several reasons. One example is the aircraft industry, which demands close tolerances for weight economy. This allows little or nothing for removing defects from finished parts. Any forging job will cost less if no defects must be removed because of poorly prepared stock.

Lastly, stainless steels require special heat treatments after forging to obtain best corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. (See the chart.) Briefly, the austenitic, ferritic and duplex grades should be annealed for optimum corrosion resistance; the martensitic grades are air-hardening and require slow cooling after forging plus subsequent annealing to prevent cracking; and the precipitation hardenable grades require a solution anneal for optimum aging response.

Carpenter practices have been perfected for developing stainless steels that have optimum forgeability as opposed to, say, optimum machinability. The factors that contribute to good inherent forgeability in Carpenter stainless steel are as follows:

1. Controlled melting process for sounder centers, cleaner metal and less center segregation.

2. Balanced analysis for better metal flow, reduced hot shortness, and less in-process preparations.

3. Rare earth additions to highly alloyed austenitic grades such as 20Cb-3® stainless for reduced hot shortness and better yields.

Every metal fabricator who hot-works steels and alloys knows how important it is to determine the best temperature range for forging each grade. The more narrow the forging range, the more critical the problem becomes.

Many tests used to predict hot-working temperature ranges are helpful in that they offer a rough measure of forgeability over a given range, but they do not give specific values. This has forced forgers to rely on approximate temperatures which, in many cases, are not the best ones for the material being worked.

Hot tensile ductility is often used to determine the forging temperature range for a given alloy. Evaluation is performed using a Gleeble thermomechanical testing unit. The main feature of the unit is the ability to reproduce any desired thermal cycle on a test specimen via resistive heating.

Whereas inherent forging quality is melted into stainless steels, there is another equally important aspect to Carpenter forging quality: mechanical forgeability. This includes factors that contribute to soundness:

1. Disc inspection and sonic inspection of in-process billets and finished forging billets.

2.Adequate surface preparation both on in-process billets for manufacturing forging bars and also final surface preparation of forging bars and billets

3. Quality control upset forging tests conducted on critical forging bar items.

Ask your Carpenter representative for additional information on Carpenter stainless steels for the forging industry.

Back to Stainless Steel Blue Book contents

Mini Dragon Heart Bottle Opener

A pocket sized version of the dragon heart bottle opener this one is tried, true, and repeatable making it an affordable opener that is just the right mix of ferocity and cuteness.

Mini Dragon Heart Bottle Opener
Mini Dragon Heart Bottle Opener
Mini Dragon Heart Bottle Opener
Mini Dragon Heart Bottle Opener
Mini Dragon Heart Bottle Opener
Mini Dragon Heart Bottle Opener

Available on etsy! ( goo.gl/b7rsbr )

Cable welded jewlery

Forge welded cable jewelry.
Forge welded cable jewelry.
Forge welded cable jewelry.
Forge welded cable jewelry.
Forge welded cable jewelry.
Forge welded cable jewelry.
image
With only a light etch barely highlighting the strands of steel.
image
With only a light etch barely highlighting the strands of steel.

A few months back I welded up a bunch of steel cable and forged this little bracelet. I’ve made a few more since. This one is still my favorite.

Happy holidays!

A bearded sea Barron who bares a slight resemblance to a young St. Nick has been bashing out frames for Christmas lights.
Being the scraggly pirate Blacksmith I am.. making some really cool things out of metal is the best way to spend the holidays.. you may know I love working with steel. If festive decoration is your thing “The Holiday light store” carries lots of fun stuff like Santa shimmying down a chimney (animated legs a flailing), reindeer, castles, planes, trains and helicopters… dolphins and pumpkins with Santa hats, presents, golf clubs (Yes!), Santa’s and elves of every variety.. Dinosaurs… a horse, candy of all sorts and more! You’ve got to see it. Even a whole wild west town complete with jail, church, saloon, bank and stables. Custom pieces to boot. Check out the website – The Holiday Light Store! Those of you in the NC area be sure to visit Hill Ridge Farms for their festival of lights.

Joy to the World
Joy to the World
Statue of liberty
Statue of liberty
Musical notes
Musical notes

misc5 misc4 dragon 3d-star fish castle peace china joy to the world whodat crawfish pot hearts misc2 misc merry christmas reef barn moose the king

Another masive project was this 3 piece extinct herbivore
Another massive project was this 3 piece extinct herbivore
Designing a making dinosaurs has been a real highlight for me
Designing a making dinosaurs has been a real highlight for me
I didn't do it
I didn’t do it
Playing around
Playing around a bit with candy cane parts

reindeer

 

Swinging the ol' ball pien
Swinging the ol’ ball pien
The deer making jig.
The deer making jig.
I felt patriotic.
I felt patriotic.
Merry Pumpkins!
Merry Pumpkins!

I got to help out around the forge and anvil at the Joel lane house again this month for their Christmas open house
Joel lane house Christmas open house
Solvar, Erica and I demonstrated flint striker forging and heat treating.
Solvar’s advice to new smiths.

All is fair in NC. (2012 State Fair)

So I’ve been abnormally busy lately learning to do something a bit new for me. I hope to talk more about it soon.. But the NC state fair wasn’t so long ago!
Several NCABANA members and I were all there demonstrating blacksmithing for record numbers of people. It was an awful lot of fun. I made some neat things, even tried some new projects I hadn’t practiced before and let a crowd watch as I scratched my head and struggled with learning a new item or two. We answered many questions and maybe even inspired a few people young and old to take a more active interest in the craft.. But mostly I made and sold leaves and bottle openers oh, and my favorite change of pace.. leaf bottle openers..
Check out the art inspired by the experience in the Pirate Blacksmith webcomic

I’m in the background probably about to burn myself or a lucky audience

Hooks, hearts, and horseshoe heart hooks

A lot of my writing and how-to stuff has sat on the back burner. With the NC state fair coming up I’ve been busy with projects big and small here are a few of the small heart themed ones.

The horseshoe heart wall hooks are fun to make and look neat to me.
It’s great for hanging your keys on or other small items.
I’ve got a more complex heart project in the works but these are some of the different hearts I’ve been making.
Some are heart-shaped wall hooks, most are heart key chains.
And I’ve even been making lanyard or key chain heart self defense tools.
A close up of the hook perfect to hang your keys on.
This a picture of the welding a key chain. It starts as a simple forge weld.

Yates mill demo

I had a fun time this weekend attending an event at Yates Mill in Raleigh with Solvarr! There was good food, lots of corn talk and music. If you’ve never been there, the lake is beautiful and the mill is a marvel.

The highlight of my day was getting to help out around the forge. I demonstrated how I make one piece steel roses.

I wish I had a photo of me working, but sadly I forgot to ask. If Ashley was there’ she’d have taken twice as many photographs. Alas I love to swing a hammer not take pictures. She’s been busy lately and has even started he own blog!

With out further adieu Yates Mill:

I love places like this.
The first thing I wanted to do was to look at how the water wheel ran.
Water was controlled via a steel level. I’d have loved to see this part forged!

 

The water wheel.

 

Here is a better shot. You can hardly tell the hurricane nearly destroyed this area in 1996.

 

Some of the surrounding buildings were neat. I enjoy old wagon wheels.

 

I know I can’t be the only one fascinated my bits of old machinery!
Am I?.. yeah guess you’d have to be there. This stuff was neat to examine.
Solvarr had his forge set up, and that was my main reason for going. A couple of other folks helped out and it was nice talking shop and seeing how others work!

 

I didn’t bring a lot of my stuff, but I brought some stuff to sell, most of the neat stuff isn’t mine =P
These bellows are just really fun to work with.
All in all I had a ton of fun, and it was nice to sit back and enjoy some music near the end of the day.

You can see a great picture of the mill drive system here. And the inside here. It’s nice to see the past still present.
-Greg

A flower candleholder wall hook

I made this flower candle holder and wall hook not so long ago. Here’s how:
I started by forging a leaf out on the end of a piece of flatbar
I then forge welded about 21″ of the bar stock over onto itself. I tapered the end and cut a small indent close to halfway to prepare for the next weld.
I folded it over once again and forge welded it.
After welding was complete I started to form a fishtail with the crosspein.
The bar is now about 1/2″x1/2″ and I still needed to punch a hole and trim the fishtail with a chisels (not photoed)
The bar was then folded and welded for a third time. This is a bit more time-consuming than jump welding smaller stock to a 1/2″x1/2″ base would be I imagine, but the finished product would look different.
I forged the hook and I can start shaping the stem to the flower. When bending the hook I noticed it was about 20 degree off horizontally when mounted flat on the wall. Instead of straightening it out and redoing it I just twisted it to the right angle. This gave an undesirable line that I refined later.
The bulk of the work is done.
This isn’t an occult blacksmithing ritual. I cut out a small semi-circle for the flower and drew a star to mark the pedals.
I used snips and a punch to form the flower. It took a little sanding too.
Rose candle hook 11
A crosspein on a stump gave the pedals texture.
rose candle hook 12
I cut off the excess stem and bent it around to secure the flower. (You can also see a steak turner I made a while before I could finish the hook and candle holder).
These little scented candles come with a thin metal pan that I glued into the center of the flower using JB-weld.

I’ll get a better picture of it mounted sometime soon I hope.
I’ve got some more projects to post eventually and some more how-to stuff too.
(update)
1119121118a
–Greg

Joel Lane house on the fourth of July

In lieu of a lengthy post I’m just sharing some photo’s from a demonstration my wife and I had a chance to help out with at the Joel Lane house in Raleigh, NC. Their fourth of July celebration was a lot of fun, great music, lots of crafts and good food. If you’re ever in the area give them a visit. The museum is a lovely place. The grounds are wonderfully maintained and attractive. A very friendly group of people working together to keep history alive and it’s mostly done by volunteer efforts so if you drop by consider making a donation.

Working the bellows and hearth.

 

Forging a small leaf

 

Here you can see the portable bellows and hearth. Great craftsmanship on the bellows.

 

The atmosphere was great and pleasant on the ears!

 

The smell of stew was enough alone to draw a hungry crowd cooked up in true mountain man style over an open fire.
There was calligraphy with quill and ink.
The writing was truly elegant, I wish we had a better photo.

 

A chandler at work making candles.
Some of his goods and tools

 

Splint weaving was just one of this gentleman’s talents, he’s also a talented blacksmith I was later informed.

 

Thank you to the Joel Lane House and museum staff/volunteers for making such a great holiday celebration possible, and especially Mr. Campbell for allowing me to help out around the forge.

 

I wouldn’t have had most of these photo’s if it wasn’t for Ashley, my lovely wife’s help. She was everywhere at once it seemed helping wherever she could and taking many more photos than I have time to share! Thank you sweet heart.

–Greg