A flower candleholder wall hook

I made this flower candle holder and wall hook not so long ago. Here’s how:
I started by forging a leaf out on the end of a piece of flatbar
I then forge welded about 21″ of the bar stock over onto itself. I tapered the end and cut a small indent close to halfway to prepare for the next weld.
I folded it over once again and forge welded it.
After welding was complete I started to form a fishtail with the crosspein.
The bar is now about 1/2″x1/2″ and I still needed to punch a hole and trim the fishtail with a chisels (not photoed)
The bar was then folded and welded for a third time. This is a bit more time-consuming than jump welding smaller stock to a 1/2″x1/2″ base would be I imagine, but the finished product would look different.
I forged the hook and I can start shaping the stem to the flower. When bending the hook I noticed it was about 20 degree off horizontally when mounted flat on the wall. Instead of straightening it out and redoing it I just twisted it to the right angle. This gave an undesirable line that I refined later.
The bulk of the work is done.
This isn’t an occult blacksmithing ritual. I cut out a small semi-circle for the flower and drew a star to mark the pedals.
I used snips and a punch to form the flower. It took a little sanding too.
Rose candle hook 11
A crosspein on a stump gave the pedals texture.
rose candle hook 12
I cut off the excess stem and bent it around to secure the flower. (You can also see a steak turner I made a while before I could finish the hook and candle holder).
These little scented candles come with a thin metal pan that I glued into the center of the flower using JB-weld.

I’ll get a better picture of it mounted sometime soon I hope.
I’ve got some more projects to post eventually and some more how-to stuff too.
(update)
1119121118a
–Greg

Dixie Classic Fairgrounds NCABANA

This past saturday was the 2nd quarterly meeting for NCabana at the Dixie Classic Fairgrounds in Winston-Salem, NC. It was a long drive be so very worth it! I love to see blacksmith shops, backyard, historic recreations, modern. They all have something to offer any person interested in any level of metal work. I took lots of photo’s and listened intently to the demonstrations. Hobbyist, professional metal workers and artist were all gathered together with a common goal of building a better and more informed community. The world of steel is better for each of these meeting and I was really happy to be a part of it!
The morning air wasn’t yet thick with humidity or heat when I first arrived and started exploring the grounds. There were many antique machines and aged building relocated to the area that caught my eye. But I took the most pictures of the shop itself.
A few of my favorite simple machines caught on camera:
A hand cranked drill simply stamped No 22, aptly made in Salem, Ohio by The Silver manufacturing company.


These bellows simply looked inspiring, I’d love to make something similar.

A treadle hammer I got a chance to try out!

The first demonstration was luckily enough on leaves and flowers. Something I’ve been working on trying to get develop a style before finishing my mothers fireplace tools. Gail Wall did a great job showing how she works sheet metal into beautiful organic forms.

Keith Roberts followed Gail demonstrating a barley twist, then he stuck around to help out Andy Phillips demonstration hardy tool creation. Giving pointers on working with a striking team. They made quick work of some rather large stock, working together like they’d done it a hundred times.
An example of a barley twist incorporated in a larger design:

Striking while the iron is hot… Very hard:

I learned a bit about annealing copper, spying an impromptu neat little folded form spiral being made over lunch, sorry no photos. My mind was beginning to wander toward the BBQ being served, but I couldn’t pry myself from where the action was!

Mr Roberts was back to wrap things up by giving a demonstration on demonstrating of all things! It was really a sight, his enthusiasm was contagious despite my heavy eyelids. He managed to inform and entertain in such a captivating way that was almost like stepping into the midway of a carnival produced by the History channel.



I stayed ’till well into the afternoon and when it was time for the long drive home. I really hope to post some more. I’ve got a lot of little projects to update and introduce. Writing, like blacksmithing, doesn’t come naturally to me. I admire good writers as much as I do craftsmen and women. Both require technique, style and attention to detail that these poor eyes don’t always have. With dedication and practice I hope to improve. Between poor eyesight, moderate dyslexia and a fumbling level of natural dexterity it sometimes feels like an uphill journey. But it’s on the long roads traveled that the destination when approached seems all the more gratifying!

–Greg