A fireplace cooking grill.

I’ve not posted an in-depth project step by step in some time.

The legs were forged and fabricated to reduce overall dimensions for shipping purposes.
The legs were forged and fabricated to reduce overall dimensions for shipping purposes.
The whole of the grill was wire brushed to bare metal and then heated to 500 degrees and coated with cooking oil to preserve the piece and provide a better cooking surface.
The whole of the grill was wire brushed to bare metal and then heated to 500 degrees and coated with cooking oil to preserve the piece and offer a better cooking surface.
The whole of the grill was wire brushed to bare metal and then heated to 500 degrees and coated with cooking oil to preserve the piece and provide a better cooking surface.
The whole of the grill was wire brushed to bare metal and then heated to 500 degrees and coated with cooking oil to preserve the piece and provide a better cooking surface.
The rivets are superficial as the 1/2 round cross bars are welded in place underneath the grill. Upsetting then ends was an aesthetic choice.
The rivets are superficial as the 1/2 round cross bars are welded in place underneath the grill. Upsetting then ends was an aesthetic choice.

The project started with a set of dimensions (24″x16″ with 7″ clearance underneath) given to me. Then I presenting various designs and features.

fireplace grill concepts for cooking
fireplace grill concepts for cooking
fireplace grill concepts for cooking (steel*)
fireplace grill concepts for cooking (steel*)
fireplace grill concepts for cooking
fireplace grill concepts for cooking
fireplace grill concepts for cooking
fireplace grill concepts for cooking
fireplace grill concepts for cooking
fireplace grill concepts for cooking
fireplace grill concepts for cooking
fireplace grill concepts for cooking

I began work with two of the forged elements out of 1/2″ round.

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Starting the leaf
Starting the leaf
The leaf finished
The leaf finished
The first two elements put together. This isn't traditional joinery but modern; later they where electric arc-welded underneath in place during assembly.
The first two elements put together. This isn’t traditional joinery but modern; later they where electric arc-welded underneath in place during assembly.
Next the 1/4 round that makes up the actual grilling surface was scroll on both ends Extras where made ahead of time as only the best made the cut. the cut
Next the 1/4 round that makes up the actual grilling surface was scroll on both ends Extras where made ahead of time as only the best made the cut. the cut
Arranging and tweaking the 1/4
Arranging and tweaking the 1/4″ round pieces.
A hole was punched and drifted on the opposite end of the leafed bar. Rings wer fabricated cold around a mandrel and all but the last forged element was welded as subtly as possible.
A hole was punched then drifted on the opposite end of the leafed bar. Rings were fabricated cold around a mandrel and all but the last forged element was welded as subtly as possible.
A 16
A 16″ piece of 2x2x1/4 inch angle iron would become the last element. Holes were drilled to allow the 1/2″ round to pass through.

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The angle iron was cut, forged and texture
The angle iron was cut, forged and texture
The angle iron was cut, forged and texture
The angle iron was cut, forged and texture
The angle iron was cut, forged and texture
The angle iron was cut, forged and texture
The angle iron was cut, forged and texture
The angle iron was cut, forged and texture
The angle iron was welded in place and the 1/2
The angle iron was welded in place and the 1/2″ round was upset to form a faux rivet head.
The legs were forged and fabricated and tested. But I'm afraid I don't have time to share that bit.
The legs were forged, fabricated and tested. But I’m afraid I don’t have time to share that bit.

It was great fun to make and as always a learning experience. I’ve got to make one for myself next!
Thanks- Greg
*To be proofed at some poin

All is fair in NC. (2012 State Fair)

So I’ve been abnormally busy lately learning to do something a bit new for me. I hope to talk more about it soon.. But the NC state fair wasn’t so long ago!
Several NCABANA members and I were all there demonstrating blacksmithing for record numbers of people. It was an awful lot of fun. I made some neat things, even tried some new projects I hadn’t practiced before and let a crowd watch as I scratched my head and struggled with learning a new item or two. We answered many questions and maybe even inspired a few people young and old to take a more active interest in the craft.. But mostly I made and sold leaves and bottle openers oh, and my favorite change of pace.. leaf bottle openers..
Check out the art inspired by the experience in the Pirate Blacksmith webcomic

I’m in the background probably about to burn myself or a lucky audience

Yates mill demo

I had a fun time this weekend attending an event at Yates Mill in Raleigh with Solvarr! There was good food, lots of corn talk and music. If you’ve never been there, the lake is beautiful and the mill is a marvel.

The highlight of my day was getting to help out around the forge. I demonstrated how I make one piece steel roses.

I wish I had a photo of me working, but sadly I forgot to ask. If Ashley was there’ she’d have taken twice as many photographs. Alas I love to swing a hammer not take pictures. She’s been busy lately and has even started he own blog!

With out further adieu Yates Mill:

I love places like this.
The first thing I wanted to do was to look at how the water wheel ran.
Water was controlled via a steel level. I’d have loved to see this part forged!

 

The water wheel.

 

Here is a better shot. You can hardly tell the hurricane nearly destroyed this area in 1996.

 

Some of the surrounding buildings were neat. I enjoy old wagon wheels.

 

I know I can’t be the only one fascinated my bits of old machinery!
Am I?.. yeah guess you’d have to be there. This stuff was neat to examine.
Solvarr had his forge set up, and that was my main reason for going. A couple of other folks helped out and it was nice talking shop and seeing how others work!

 

I didn’t bring a lot of my stuff, but I brought some stuff to sell, most of the neat stuff isn’t mine =P
These bellows are just really fun to work with.
All in all I had a ton of fun, and it was nice to sit back and enjoy some music near the end of the day.

You can see a great picture of the mill drive system here. And the inside here. It’s nice to see the past still present.
-Greg