Hand forged Sure-Grip Bottle Opener

Available in the AAAPB etsy store.

Hand forged Sure-Grip Bottle Opener
Hand forged Sure-Grip Bottle Opener
Hand forged Sure-Grip Bottle Opener
Hand forged Sure-Grip Bottle Opener
Hand forged Sure-Grip Bottle Opener
Hand forged Sure-Grip Bottle Opener

A one of a kind and artistic bottle opener forged by hand, hammer, hearth– Arm and eye. Unlike some of my bottle openers I’ll never make another styled like this and it’ll always be a one of a kind lid lifter that has both heart and soul.
“Craft beer doesn’t taste better with a craft bottle opener, it just feels better” – Greg D. PriceSmith

Socket Wrench forged into bottle opener.

I’ve been dabbling with some bottle openers from wrenches and socket wenches.. er wrenches.
I’m a po-boy shade tree sort so I aim to err on the side of caution. When an unknown sort of steel is used – danger is always a chance.

Socket wrench repurchased into forged bottle openers.
Socket wrench repurchased into forged bottle openers.
They're be customized to order.
They’ll be customized to order.




— Random other cool stuff to waste your time with —





Homemadetools.net
is such a great resource for finding and sharing knowledge. Check out these Tips from Old Millrat – James D. Thompson he makes Mini Scorps


The following except is from Cartech.com:
Carpenter Stainless Steel “Blue Book”: Fabrication

Revised June 2006


Forging Carpenter Stainless Steels

In all metalworking operations, stainless steel can be easily worked when the characteristics of these alloys are understood. Stainless steels have good inherent forgeability, but there are important differences from the carbon and low-alloy steels.

Most importantly, stainless steels are much stronger at forging temperatures and thus require greater force or more blows under a hammer than is required for leaner alloys. The high temperature alloys are even harder and more resistant to flow in forging operations.

All stainless steels have much lower thermal conductivity than ordinary steel—thus the heat penetrates the steel more slowly. The best results are obtained in a muffle or semimuffle type of furnace with pyrometer control. Keep open flames away from the steel.

As shown in the table, the forging temperature depends upon the type of steel—austenitic, martensitic, ferritic, duplex or precipitation hardenable, with a few special cases. There is no simple rule to follow for thermal handling on either heating or cooling. The suggested forging temperatures should be attained by heating in furnaces held at those temperatures (all temperatures are furnace temperatures, not die temperatures). The furnace must not be run excessively hot and the steel withdrawn “on the fly” as it rushes up to the forging heat. This gives a wash heat on the surface and a cold center.

Grade

Forge Below

Forge Above

Special Instructions

°F

°C

°F

°C

Type 302
Type 304
Type 304L
NeutroSorb PLUS® alloy

1700
1700
1700
1800

927
927
927
982

2300
2300
2300
2200

1260
1260
1260
1204

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings in air.
Anneal after forging to restore corrosion resistance.

Forging temperature varies
with Boron Content.

Type 303
Type 303Se
Type 305
Type 309
Type 309S

Type 310
Type 310S
Type 384
Type 316
Type 316L

Type 317
Type 321
Type 347
20Cb-3® stainless

1700
1700
1700
1800
1800

1800
1800
1700
1700
1700

1700
1700
1700
1800

927
927
927
982
982

982
982
927
927
927

927
927
927
982

2300
2300
2300
2250
2250

2250
2250
2250
2300
2300

2300
2300
2250
2250

1260
1260
1260
1232
1232

1232
1232
1232
1260
1260

1260
1260
1232
1232

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings in air.
Anneal after forging to restore corrosion resistance.

Type 410
Type 414
Type 416

1650
1650
1700

899
899
927

2200
2200
2250

1204
1204
1232

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings in air. Do not quench.
Anneal after forging to avoid cracking; cool to room temperature before annealing.
Type 420
Type 420F

1650
1650

899
899

2200
2200

1204
1204

Slow preheat is necessary.
Cool forgings very slowly. Furnace cooling preferred.
Anneal after forging to avoid cracking; cool to room temperature before annealing.
Type 431

1650

899

2200

1204

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings slowly.
Anneal after forging to avoid cracking; cool to room temperature before annealing.
Type 440A
Type 440B
Type 440C
Type 440F

1700
1700
1700
1700

927
927
927
927

2200
2150
2100
2100

1204
1177
1149
1149

Slow preheat is necessary.
Cool forgings very slowly. Furnace cooling preferred.
Anneal after forging to avoid cracking; cool to room temperature before annealing.
Pyromet® Alloy 355

1700

927

2100

1149

Slow preheat is not necessary. Air cool, equalize and overtemper.
Custom 455® stainless
Custom 450® stainless
Custom 630 (17Cr-4Ni)

1650
1650
1850

899
899
1010

2300
2300
2200

1260
1260
1204

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings in air and anneal.
Type 409Cb
Type 430
Type 430F
7-Mo® stainless

1500
1500
1500
1700

816
816
816
927

2050
2050
2100
2000

1121
1121
1149
1093

Slow preheat is necessary.
Cool forgings in air.
When reheating, use lower forging temperature and
finish cold as possible for optimum grain refinement.
Anneal after forging to restore corrosion resistance.
7-Mo® PLUS stainless

2150

1177

2375

1302

Slow preheat is not necessary.
Cool forgings in air.
Anneal after forging to restore corrosion resistance.

Hold the heating furnace steady at the proper forging temperature and no hotter; allow the steel to soak out a little before withdrawing, and it will flow readily under the dies. In order not to slow down the forging operation and still run the furnace at a “slow” heat, more bars or billets can usually be heated at one time.

Most grades are subject to rapid grain growth at the forging heat. If all parts of the steel are thoroughly forged after heating, the grain structure will be refined again. If some parts of the forging get little reduction under the hammer, care must be exercised to limit grain growth by avoiding a long soak at temperature.

Surface preparation of forging bars and billets is generally more critical for stainless steels for several reasons. One example is the aircraft industry, which demands close tolerances for weight economy. This allows little or nothing for removing defects from finished parts. Any forging job will cost less if no defects must be removed because of poorly prepared stock.

Lastly, stainless steels require special heat treatments after forging to obtain best corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. (See the chart.) Briefly, the austenitic, ferritic and duplex grades should be annealed for optimum corrosion resistance; the martensitic grades are air-hardening and require slow cooling after forging plus subsequent annealing to prevent cracking; and the precipitation hardenable grades require a solution anneal for optimum aging response.

Carpenter practices have been perfected for developing stainless steels that have optimum forgeability as opposed to, say, optimum machinability. The factors that contribute to good inherent forgeability in Carpenter stainless steel are as follows:

1. Controlled melting process for sounder centers, cleaner metal and less center segregation.

2. Balanced analysis for better metal flow, reduced hot shortness, and less in-process preparations.

3. Rare earth additions to highly alloyed austenitic grades such as 20Cb-3® stainless for reduced hot shortness and better yields.

Every metal fabricator who hot-works steels and alloys knows how important it is to determine the best temperature range for forging each grade. The more narrow the forging range, the more critical the problem becomes.

Many tests used to predict hot-working temperature ranges are helpful in that they offer a rough measure of forgeability over a given range, but they do not give specific values. This has forced forgers to rely on approximate temperatures which, in many cases, are not the best ones for the material being worked.

Hot tensile ductility is often used to determine the forging temperature range for a given alloy. Evaluation is performed using a Gleeble thermomechanical testing unit. The main feature of the unit is the ability to reproduce any desired thermal cycle on a test specimen via resistive heating.

Whereas inherent forging quality is melted into stainless steels, there is another equally important aspect to Carpenter forging quality: mechanical forgeability. This includes factors that contribute to soundness:

1. Disc inspection and sonic inspection of in-process billets and finished forging billets.

2.Adequate surface preparation both on in-process billets for manufacturing forging bars and also final surface preparation of forging bars and billets

3. Quality control upset forging tests conducted on critical forging bar items.

Ask your Carpenter representative for additional information on Carpenter stainless steels for the forging industry.

Back to Stainless Steel Blue Book contents

Forging a cut-off hardie

I forged a cut-off hardie a while back. I took some pictures along the way. I hope you enjoy.

I used an ax wedged into a stump as a cut-off for a long time, but it’s time for an upgrade.
I used an ax and sledge to cut the end off the jack hammer bit.
I forged the hardie section down some.
The jack hammer bit I forged down.
This only took a few heats.
Before I evened out the edge and sharpened it with a file.
After the file work.
After I let it normalize I heated the cut-off and then quenched it in oil.
I then immediately tempered to a golden straw.
I tempered it in the oven again, twice: once after fire tempering, and once the next day.

I’ve been working on creating some extra pages for my blog. I can’t wait to publish them.

Hot Diggity Dawg

A cordial ‘gent and I got together not so long ago. He’s retired but still works as a hot dog vendor. When he dropped in with a real nice custom cart in tow. It was a simple enough task and a while later I’d finished. He asked for one thing done but mentioned some other things he’d like done. I told him I’d make him something simple and affordable to get the job done, and something with a little more visual appeal.












I went ahead and made something to keep the condiment cooler open to the appropriate height since the fella mentioned it.



I really like making functional stuff. It’s satisfying to make a tool to specifications and attempt to make it visually appealing. But it’s difficult for me to put a price tag on the stuff I make. It’s this odd double standard in my mind on value. I got into this kind of work because of a sort of independence. I’ve always liked making things and it never made sense to me buying something or paying someone to do something I could do myself. If someone needs something I don’t ever want to send them home empty-handed; I’m not the type to take advantage of someone who needs help. But I’m a man who wants to build a business out of a hobby so I have to think about money. With as much of myself that’s intertwined into everything I do it’s almost enough to make me feel a bit like, pardon me, a whore. How do you put a price tag on a piece of yourself? Especially if you’re the sort of person that prefers to make things instead of buy ’em. I understand a majority of the factors to consider but I’m no true business minded man. The next day I gave the ‘gent a price for any two of the three pieces, and another price for all three. The fellow kindly took all three and seemed satisfied.

–Greg

File making

I’m very found of making things from steel and sometimes I just have to ask.. how did they do that? Our rich human history of creation is an infinite pool of knowledge to wade through for inspiration. The wealth of research available is engrossing. I’ve found myself wondering about digital copies of books. Their scans seem dusty and to smell of musk like walking through a damp, gray tomb of knowledge.. Admittedly it could be my imagination. Or more likely the lack of a good shower wafting about. =)
I digress. I’m very thankful to live in an age where knowledge is abundant.

One of mans oldest tools is the file. A cutting tool like the saw. The two are nearly as ancient as the knife and it’s cousin with a little more leverage, the ax. Rocks, gems, bones and fish spines can be used to remove material for crafting. Modern files and rasp are easily recognized as the descendant’s of these ancient tools. Metal working files were known around the world in some form of another. 14th century Europe had a change in architecture and culture lead to more ironwork being refined cold with file work becoming abundant. By the 17th century file making would have been a full-time endeavor for some. A file cutter would take a shaped piece of annealed steel ground smooth with a stone or file. He’d strap it firmly to a work block or anvil with a softer metal between the file blank and anvil. Then teeth were cut into the file by hand on both sides. As many as 60 to 80 blows per minute could be delivered by an experience cutter. The angle of the chisel was dependent on the aggressiveness of the file desired but it could be between 40-65 degrees. Next the file was carefully hardened and tempered depending on the type of steel and file.

The file in history by Henry Disston & Sons, Inc
For more information on files check these out:

The File In History
The Manufacturer and builder, Volume 26 (page 280) 1894
File-Making by Hand and Machinery from “The Manufacturer and Builder” November, 1889
The legend of the knife from a file
(
update – This is a really nice blog entree about file making)

On a personal note. The studio has been organized, an office arranged and we’ve switched Internet service providers. A faster network has finally reached our neck of the woods here Clayton, NC.
Most recently a lot of my time has been spent organizing photos and a bit of modern file work. I do most of my reading, writing and photo work on a faithful ol’ laptop running Ubuntu; occasionally I migrate toward the desktop as I familiarize myself with google sketch-up so the two are not far from one another.

–Greg

Dixie Classic Fairgrounds NCABANA

This past saturday was the 2nd quarterly meeting for NCabana at the Dixie Classic Fairgrounds in Winston-Salem, NC. It was a long drive be so very worth it! I love to see blacksmith shops, backyard, historic recreations, modern. They all have something to offer any person interested in any level of metal work. I took lots of photo’s and listened intently to the demonstrations. Hobbyist, professional metal workers and artist were all gathered together with a common goal of building a better and more informed community. The world of steel is better for each of these meeting and I was really happy to be a part of it!
The morning air wasn’t yet thick with humidity or heat when I first arrived and started exploring the grounds. There were many antique machines and aged building relocated to the area that caught my eye. But I took the most pictures of the shop itself.
A few of my favorite simple machines caught on camera:
A hand cranked drill simply stamped No 22, aptly made in Salem, Ohio by The Silver manufacturing company.


These bellows simply looked inspiring, I’d love to make something similar.

A treadle hammer I got a chance to try out!

The first demonstration was luckily enough on leaves and flowers. Something I’ve been working on trying to get develop a style before finishing my mothers fireplace tools. Gail Wall did a great job showing how she works sheet metal into beautiful organic forms.

Keith Roberts followed Gail demonstrating a barley twist, then he stuck around to help out Andy Phillips demonstration hardy tool creation. Giving pointers on working with a striking team. They made quick work of some rather large stock, working together like they’d done it a hundred times.
An example of a barley twist incorporated in a larger design:

Striking while the iron is hot… Very hard:

I learned a bit about annealing copper, spying an impromptu neat little folded form spiral being made over lunch, sorry no photos. My mind was beginning to wander toward the BBQ being served, but I couldn’t pry myself from where the action was!

Mr Roberts was back to wrap things up by giving a demonstration on demonstrating of all things! It was really a sight, his enthusiasm was contagious despite my heavy eyelids. He managed to inform and entertain in such a captivating way that was almost like stepping into the midway of a carnival produced by the History channel.



I stayed ’till well into the afternoon and when it was time for the long drive home. I really hope to post some more. I’ve got a lot of little projects to update and introduce. Writing, like blacksmithing, doesn’t come naturally to me. I admire good writers as much as I do craftsmen and women. Both require technique, style and attention to detail that these poor eyes don’t always have. With dedication and practice I hope to improve. Between poor eyesight, moderate dyslexia and a fumbling level of natural dexterity it sometimes feels like an uphill journey. But it’s on the long roads traveled that the destination when approached seems all the more gratifying!

–Greg

NCABANA meeting chisel, charcoal brazier, and tongs

I had a great time hanging out with guys of NCABANA at Eric Campbells shop! He demonstrated his approach to a Mark Aspery style chisel. Anyone who wanted too could make one too! He had a couple crowbars and I had a chance to try my hand at one myself. Here is a picture of it rough forged:

He also gave us some insight to how he makes his charcoal braziers.

Some open forges were set up and I spotted some tong making and had to snap some pictures:


I look forward to next time!

–Greg

Time to make the donuts.. err cutlass

I woke up this morning and on my way to the coffee maker I could have sworn I saw a familiar face walking by me muttering about the donuts. (I’m not even old enough to remember that commercial, how did it become part of my pop-culture memory bank) Hehe burning the candle at both ends is worth it though!






I can’t wait to share the finished product!
I’ve also got another rose in the works. Wish me luck when I get back to it!

–Greg

Tiny tongs from RR-spikes.

Here they are polished up a bit. (touched with a worn sanding wheel and wire brush)
They’re more pliers when they’re this size. They’re functional as is but I want to flatten the grooved jaws a bit and give them some more decorative flair. A gift to my grandfather.










They hold 1/8″ round firmly.

Until next time…
To see the finished tongs, checkout the next post on tongs.

–Greg