Happy holidays!

A bearded sea Barron who bares a slight resemblance to a young St. Nick has been bashing out frames for Christmas lights.
Being the scraggly pirate Blacksmith I am.. making some really cool things out of metal is the best way to spend the holidays.. you may know I love working with steel. If festive decoration is your thing “The Holiday light store” carries lots of fun stuff like Santa shimmying down a chimney (animated legs a flailing), reindeer, castles, planes, trains and helicopters… dolphins and pumpkins with Santa hats, presents, golf clubs (Yes!), Santa’s and elves of every variety.. Dinosaurs… a horse, candy of all sorts and more! You’ve got to see it. Even a whole wild west town complete with jail, church, saloon, bank and stables. Custom pieces to boot. Check out the website – The Holiday Light Store! Those of you in the NC area be sure to visit Hill Ridge Farms for their festival of lights.

Joy to the World
Joy to the World
Statue of liberty
Statue of liberty
Musical notes
Musical notes

misc5 misc4 dragon 3d-star fish castle peace china joy to the world whodat crawfish pot hearts misc2 misc merry christmas reef barn moose the king

Another masive project was this 3 piece extinct herbivore
Another massive project was this 3 piece extinct herbivore
Designing a making dinosaurs has been a real highlight for me
Designing a making dinosaurs has been a real highlight for me
I didn't do it
I didn’t do it
Playing around
Playing around a bit with candy cane parts

reindeer

 

Swinging the ol' ball pien
Swinging the ol’ ball pien
The deer making jig.
The deer making jig.
I felt patriotic.
I felt patriotic.
Merry Pumpkins!
Merry Pumpkins!

I got to help out around the forge and anvil at the Joel lane house again this month for their Christmas open house
Joel lane house Christmas open house
Solvar, Erica and I demonstrated flint striker forging and heat treating.
Solvar’s advice to new smiths.

A flower candleholder wall hook

I made this flower candle holder and wall hook not so long ago. Here’s how:
I started by forging a leaf out on the end of a piece of flatbar
I then forge welded about 21″ of the bar stock over onto itself. I tapered the end and cut a small indent close to halfway to prepare for the next weld.
I folded it over once again and forge welded it.
After welding was complete I started to form a fishtail with the crosspein.
The bar is now about 1/2″x1/2″ and I still needed to punch a hole and trim the fishtail with a chisels (not photoed)
The bar was then folded and welded for a third time. This is a bit more time-consuming than jump welding smaller stock to a 1/2″x1/2″ base would be I imagine, but the finished product would look different.
I forged the hook and I can start shaping the stem to the flower. When bending the hook I noticed it was about 20 degree off horizontally when mounted flat on the wall. Instead of straightening it out and redoing it I just twisted it to the right angle. This gave an undesirable line that I refined later.
The bulk of the work is done.
This isn’t an occult blacksmithing ritual. I cut out a small semi-circle for the flower and drew a star to mark the pedals.
I used snips and a punch to form the flower. It took a little sanding too.
Rose candle hook 11
A crosspein on a stump gave the pedals texture.
rose candle hook 12
I cut off the excess stem and bent it around to secure the flower. (You can also see a steak turner I made a while before I could finish the hook and candle holder).
These little scented candles come with a thin metal pan that I glued into the center of the flower using JB-weld.

I’ll get a better picture of it mounted sometime soon I hope.
I’ve got some more projects to post eventually and some more how-to stuff too.
(update)
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–Greg

Hot Diggity Dawg

A cordial ‘gent and I got together not so long ago. He’s retired but still works as a hot dog vendor. When he dropped in with a real nice custom cart in tow. It was a simple enough task and a while later I’d finished. He asked for one thing done but mentioned some other things he’d like done. I told him I’d make him something simple and affordable to get the job done, and something with a little more visual appeal.












I went ahead and made something to keep the condiment cooler open to the appropriate height since the fella mentioned it.



I really like making functional stuff. It’s satisfying to make a tool to specifications and attempt to make it visually appealing. But it’s difficult for me to put a price tag on the stuff I make. It’s this odd double standard in my mind on value. I got into this kind of work because of a sort of independence. I’ve always liked making things and it never made sense to me buying something or paying someone to do something I could do myself. If someone needs something I don’t ever want to send them home empty-handed; I’m not the type to take advantage of someone who needs help. But I’m a man who wants to build a business out of a hobby so I have to think about money. With as much of myself that’s intertwined into everything I do it’s almost enough to make me feel a bit like, pardon me, a whore. How do you put a price tag on a piece of yourself? Especially if you’re the sort of person that prefers to make things instead of buy ’em. I understand a majority of the factors to consider but I’m no true business minded man. The next day I gave the ‘gent a price for any two of the three pieces, and another price for all three. The fellow kindly took all three and seemed satisfied.

–Greg

Hooks n’ Hangers are happening!

I finished up my hooks project. I think the Lee’s were very happy, they bought all the hooks I made! I’m going to get a picture of the lamps mounted at some point I hope. I’m really proud of the second pair of hooks I made. I took some photo’s of the near finished products, but I wish I had time to take more! I need to adjust one still close up the bends on the flat mounting part that looks like an upside down heart.










I’ve been working on my large knife blue print a little bit at a time. It’s coming along nicely it’ll look really good when finished I think I’ve got to finish up my Damascus blade soon too.

–Greg

Time to make the donuts.. err cutlass

I woke up this morning and on my way to the coffee maker I could have sworn I saw a familiar face walking by me muttering about the donuts. (I’m not even old enough to remember that commercial, how did it become part of my pop-culture memory bank) Hehe burning the candle at both ends is worth it though!






I can’t wait to share the finished product!
I’ve also got another rose in the works. Wish me luck when I get back to it!

–Greg

Tiny tongs from RR-spikes.

Here they are polished up a bit. (touched with a worn sanding wheel and wire brush)
They’re more pliers when they’re this size. They’re functional as is but I want to flatten the grooved jaws a bit and give them some more decorative flair. A gift to my grandfather.










They hold 1/8″ round firmly.

Until next time…
To see the finished tongs, checkout the next post on tongs.

–Greg

Scurvy Dog Cutlass

This was a piece of medium carbon steel(?) reclaimed and straightend to barstock. Forged with charcoal.

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I went with a wrapped hemp cord handle.
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–Greg

Land Lubber Cutlass

finishing
You can see the PriceSmith and Jolly Roger etch.
DSCI0688
Less visible is the subtable lightening etch that covers most of it’s large blade.
DSCI0684
The horseshoe probably came from my grandfathers ol’ horse RoyalBoy. A fine horse.

–Greg

The AAAPirate Blacksmith Blog

AAAPirateBlacksmith forgery — “Where I’m not a real blacksmith, but I smell like one”

I’m an odd guy at times with an interesting perspective of the world. I like to work with my hands and make.. well.. stuff. I really get a kick out of sharing it with folks and I hope ya’ll enjoy it. Thanks – Greg Price (Greg Pricesmith)

Hey folks, I’m the blacksmith’s wife!!! I help in the shop from time to time, do a little chainmaille on the side, and play tons of piano. I also enjoy working with my hands and helping my husband share his passion for metal work with the world. Enjoy our blog! — Ashley Smith (AshleyPriceSmith)

Working the bellows and hearth.
Working the bellows and hearth with Eric “Solvar” Campbell at the historic Joel Lane house museum In Raleigh, NC.
I listened a lot to some of the other smiths. Here you can see Mr. Green in the foreground and Al the kind fellow who taught me nail making at my first Abana meeting. (I'm in the background probably about to burn myself =P)
My First time demonstrating at the NCstate Fair. I enjoyed listening to some of the other smiths. Here you can see Mr. Green in the foreground and Al the kind fellow who taught me nail making at my first Abana meeting. (I’m in the background probably about to burn myself =P)
Merry Pumpkins!
Merry Pumpkins!
Look at all that class.
Look at all that class.
I didn't do it
I didn’t do it
After I let it normalize, I heated the cut-off and then quenched it in oil.
Quenching a newly heat-treated tool.